Roger Avary

Award-winning filmmaker Roger Avary first began experimenting in Beta I video and 8mm film formats during the late 1970s. In 1983, his Super-8mm supernatural thriller The Worm Turns won Best Film from the Los Angeles Film Teachers Association Film Expo. He went on to attend the Pasadena Art Center College of Design’s film program. Avary then worked in advertising at DMB&B and J. Walter Thompson.

In 1994, Avary was awarded an Academy Award for his work as a writer with Quentin Tarantino on their screenplay for Pulp Fiction. The screenplay for Pulp Fiction earned Avary and Tarantino additional accolades, including a BAFTA, the Boston Society of Film Critics Award, the Chicago Society of Film Critics Award, the Los Angeles Film Critics Association Award, the New York Film Critics Circle Award, and the Independent Spirit Award for Best Screenplay.

Also in 1994, Avary wrote and directed the French neonoir crime thriller Killing Zoe, which Roger Ebert hailed as ‘Generation X’s first Bank Caper Movie.’ Killing Zoe is notable as the first feature film to utilize swing and tilt bellows lenses in its production. The film was honored with le Prix tres special a Cannes, the same year that Pulp Fiction took home the Palm d’Or. Killing Zoe continued to win awards worldwide on the festival circuit, including Best Film at Japan’s Yubari International Film Festival and the Italian Mystfest. The film was also celebrated by the Cinemathique Francaise, who heralded Avary as the Antonin Artaud of cinema during their Cinema of Cruelty retrospective.

In 2002, Avary wrote and directed the filmed adaptation of the Bret Easton Ellis novel The Rules of Attraction, which he also executive-produced. The Rules of Attraction is notable as the first studio motion picture to prove reliable use of Apple’s Final Cut Pro editing system. Roger Avary became an Apple spokesperson for Final Cut Pro 3, appearing in print and web ads worldwide. His film within the film, Glitterati (2004), used elements of Victor’s European trip and was shot entirely on digital video with a crew of two (Avary and producer Greg Shapiro). In 2005, he purchased the rights to another Bret Easton Ellis novel, Glamorama, which is in development at Avary’s company for him to direct.

In 2006, he penned the movie adaptation of the hit Konami video game Silent Hill for French director Christophe Gans. Silent Hill debuted as #1 at the U.S. box office and has been embraced by video game fans as one of the first game-to-film adaptations that is true to the imagery and spirit of its source material.

In 2007, novelist Neil Gaiman & Roger Avary wrote and produced an adaptation of Beowulf with director Robert Zemeckis for Paramount Pictures. Utilizing a complex process of digitally enhanced live action, the film tells the oldest English language story through the use of the most modern technology available.

In 2017 Avary directed a French language filmed adaptation of Jean Cocteau’s one-woman play, La voix humaine, starring actress Elsa Zylberstein.

Also in 2017 Avary wrote and directed the comedic thriller, Lucky Day, for producer Don Carmody, and starring Luke Bracey, Nina Dobrev, Crispin Glover, David Hewlett, and Tomer Sisley.

Roger Avary divides his time between Los Angeles, Paris, and Toronto. He is represented by his attorney, Craig Emanuel of Paul Hastings LLP Los Angeles.

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