Giovannie Espiritu

Giovannie Espiritu was nominated alongside Academy Award Nominees Alfre Woodard and Amy Irving for Best Supporting Actress at MethodFest for the Mynah Films feature film Fiona’s Script. She has voiced characters in international video games and cartoons, directed several theater productions at the Herbst Theater in San Francisco, and produced several short films. She can be seen as the series lead in the series, “Dyke Central,” which was featured in After Ellen, BuzzFeed, and Curve Magazine as a top lesbian series to watch. As a filmmaker, she was featured in Elizabeth Banks’ WhoHaHa Media for her parody song, “An Introvert’s World,” and her storytelling has been featured in Ms. Magazine. A two-time Outfest Fusion Filmmaker, her short film, “Ultra-Feminist,” was awarded Honorable Mention.

She coaches kids/teens online nationwide through HollywoodActorsWorkshop.com and was just named as one of the top 40 Audition Coaches in Los Angeles by the Hollywood Winners Circle founded by Wendy Alane Wright, a top talent manager. Her students are represented by the top agencies in the Bay Area and Los Angeles and notable student alumni include William Lipton (Daytime Emmy Nominee, Cameron on General Hospital) and the Espina Sisters (Hosts of Dreamworks’ “Life Hacks for Kids on the Road”).

In her spare time, she rock climbs and advocates for Domestic Violence Awareness/Prevention and LGBTQ equality. She has served on the Board of Directors for C.O.R.A. (a Bay Area domestic violence hotline and agency) and been awarded a Certificate of Recognition from the Senate and the California Assembly for her community service.

As a believer in Gandhi’s maxim, “Be the change you wish to see in the world,” Giovannie began writing as a way to create more diversity in the film industry. Soon, it became another outlet for catharsis and healing as she relived deeply personal stories and wove them into her work, along with the lessons learned. Her ultimate goal and “nefarious plan” is to break hearts wide open to create more empathy and compassion by forcing audiences to walk in someone else’s shoes.

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